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CDMPC

Construction Design & Management Project Coordination

Welcome

Congratulations you have just landed at our One Stop Shop for CDM 2015 Advice, Guidance, and Documentation.

CDMPC began trading in 2009, the company was created to add ‘H&S Valve’ to Clients, Designers and Principal Contractor, projects, following the changes to the CDM regulations in 2007.

Since inception, we have provided advice and guidance, on a range of projects from small domestic projects to multi million pound commercial projects.

We cover the south of England, from our base in Oxford, (find us on google maps CDMPC) working for private commercial developers, local authorities, and SME contractors

Areas of expertise : schools, colleges and government buildings, large scale commercial development, large scale private residential developments

We also pride ourselves on being able to cater for the smaller end of the market, private developer set up, New or existing Principal contractor, set up and guidance


Our mission statement is to:
  • Integrate H&S, as an integral part of the design/construction process
  • Ensure Pre-Construction Information is communicated to all
  • Reduce unnecessary H&S paperwork/burden
  • Provide the right information, to the right people, at the right time!

Here at CDMPC, we tailor our advice to your project needs

We are specialists in construction CDM 2015 Principal Design, H&S, and contractor site/management documentation

Whether you’re a client, who needs early stage advice and guidance

Architectural practice, that needs Principal Designer advice and support

Or a principal contractor that needs a one off or full set company specific documentation

We cover it all

Contact one of our team today by using the form or give us a call

You will be met by one of our friendly staff, who will discuss your project/requirements

We will give you free initial advice and guidance

Provide fee fix consultancy packages

Tailored to your needs as a small, medium, or large client/company


CDMPC

HSE News

What is CDM 2015?

CDM 1994

The regulations were first introduced in 1994 as part of the EU legislation (Directive 92/57/EEC - temporary or mobile construction sites)

The Directive set out minimum safety and health requirements for temporary or mobile construction sites i.e. any construction site at which building or civil engineering works are carried out and intended to prevent risks by establishing a chain of responsibility linking all the parties involved.

The regulation introduced the need to look at H&S in construction, from project inception - final demolition.

Between 1994 and 2007 guidance was available via the Planning Supervisor (H&S based professional, appointed as part of the design team)

Further research and development provided a better understanding of the complexities of design and construction and the need to integrating H&S into the process.


CDM 2007

This led to the introduction of the CDM Regulations 2007 and aimed to:

  • Encourage everyone to work together to make health and safety an integral part of the design, construction and management of projects
  • Improve planning and management from day one to identify hazards so that they can be eliminated or properly managed
  • Target effort where it can be most effective in terms of health and safety
  • Encourage co-operation and co-ordination of the project

At this point the planning supervisor was replaced by the introduction of the CDM coordinator.




CDM 2015

In 2015 the regulations were changed again, experience in the UK construction industry led the HSE to believe there was a need:

  • to embed the principals of CDM at the smaller end of the industry where the majority of the accidents occur (more than one contractor)
  • for greater alignment with the Temporary or Mobile Construction Sites Directive (TMCSD)
  • for a more simple, linear and direct structure that maintained the same 'core' principals as CDM 2007

The new regulations (CDM 2015) aims to improve health and safety in the industry by helping all involved to:

  • sensibly plan the work so the risks involved are managed from start to finish
  • have the right people for the right job at the right time
  • cooperate and coordinate your work with others
  • have the right information about the risks and how they are being managed
  • communicate this information effectively to those who need to know
  • consult and engage with workers about the risks and how they are being managed

This was a welcomed return to basic values provided by the initial 1994 regulations.

Integration of a H&S professional into the design team for any project, hence the replacement of the CDM coordinator with the introduction of the Principal designer

This is where CDMPC are ahead of the game, company director Stephen Dallow, was first appointed a planning supervisor for local authority works back in the 00’s

He has worked on a large range of projects from small £20,000 extensions to large commercial projects £65m, providing advice and guidance as a Planning supervisor, CDM Coordinator and now Principal Designer.

We only appoint advisers that have embedded knowledge and understanding of the core values of CDM.




How does CDM 2015 affect you?
CDMPC

The Construction (Design & Management) Regulations (CDM) are the main set of regulations for managing the health, safety and welfare of construction projects.

CDM applies to all building and construction work and includes new build, demolition, refurbishment, extensions, conversions, repair and maintenance.

The regulations place responsibilities on five duty holders, the Client, Principal Designer, Principal Contractors, Designer, and Contractor.

The industry guidance has been created by members of CONIAC (Construction Industry Advisory Committee) and Published by CITB/HSE, Construction Industry Training Board 2015, Health and safety executive.

There are six guides: one for each of the five duty holders under CDM and an additional one for workers.

The guides are based on sound industry practice and will help small businesses and organisations deliver building and construction projects in a way that prevents injury and ill-health.

Annex A CDM Duty holders and their roles summarised

Duty holder

Summary of role/main duties

Clients

Organisations or individuals for whom a construction project is carried out.


Make suitable arrangements for managing a project. This includes making sure that:

• other duty holders are appointed

• sufficient time and resources are allocated.

Clients must also make sure that:

• relevant information is prepared and provided to other duty holders

• the principal designer and principal contractor carry out their duties

• welfare facilities are provided.

• F10 Notification to HSE

Domestic clients

People who have construction work carried out on their own home, or the home of a family member, that is not done in furtherance of a business, whether for profit or not.


Domestic clients are in scope of CDM 2015 but their duties as a client are normally transferred to:

• the contractor, on a single contractor project

or

• the principal contractor, on a project involving more than one contractor.

However, the domestic client can choose to have a written agreement for the principal designer to carry out the client duties

Principal designers

Designers appointed by the client in projects involving more than one contractor. They can be an organisation or an individual with sufficient knowledge, experience and ability to carry out the role.

Plan, manage, monitor and co-ordinate health and safety in the pre-construction phase of a project.

This includes:

• identifying, eliminating or controlling foreseeable risks

• ensuring designers carry out their duties.

Prepare and provide relevant information to other duty holders.

Provide relevant information to the principal contractor to help them plan, manage, monitor and co-ordinate health and safety in the construction phase.

Designers

Those who, as part of a business, prepare or modify designs for a building or product, or prepare or modify designs to systems relating to construction work.

When preparing or modifying designs, eliminate, reduce or control foreseeable risks that may arise during:

• construction

and

• the maintenance and use of a building once it is built.

Provide information to other members of the project team to help them fulfil their duties.

Contractors

Those who do the actual construction work. They can be either an individual or a company.

Plan, manage and monitor construction work under their control so that it is carried out without risks to health and safety.

For projects involving more than one contractor, co-ordinate their activities with others in the project team – in particular, comply with directions given to them by the principal designer or principal contractor.

For single-contractor projects, prepare a construction phase plan.

Principal contractors

Contractors appointed by the client to co-ordinate the construction phase of a project where it involves more than one contractor.

Plan, manage, monitor and co-ordinate health and safety in the construction phase of a project. This includes:

• liaising with the client and principal designer

• preparing the construction phase plan

• organising co-operation between contractors and co-ordinating their work.

Ensure that:

• suitable site inductions are provided

• reasonable steps are taken to prevent unauthorised access

• workers are consulted and engaged in securing their health and safety

• welfare facilities are provided.

Workers

The people who work for or under the control of contractors on a construction site.

They must:

• be consulted about matters which affect their health, safety and welfare

• take care of their own health and safety and that of others who may be affected by their actions

• report anything they see which is likely to endanger either their own or others’ health and safety

• co-operate with their employer, fellow workers, contractors and other duty holders.

* Organisations or individuals can carry out the role of more than one duty holder, provided they have the skills, knowledge, experience and (if an organisation) the organisational capability necessary to carry out those roles in a way that secures health and safety.

Client Duties

Domestic or Commercial

CDM 2015 defines a client as anyone for whom a construction project is carried out. The regulations apply to both domestic and commercial clients.




Domestic

You are a domestic client if you are having work carried out which is not connected with running a business. Usually, this means arranging for work to be carried out on the property where you or a family member lives.

Domestic clients are in scope of CDM 2015 but their duties as a client are normally transferred to:

  • the contractor, on a single contractor project

or

  • the principal contractor, on a project involving more than one contractor.

However, the domestic client can choose to have a written agreement for the architect / principal designer to carry out the client duties

Speak with your contactor, if you feel your contractor may not have the time or resource, to take on these duties, you can appoint us to carry out these for you.




Commercial

A commercial client is an organisation or individual for whom a construction project is carried out in connection with a business, whether the business operates for profit or not.

Examples of commercial clients are schools, retailers and landlords, developers etc.

Commercial clients must make suitable arrangements for managing a project.

This includes making sure that:

  • other duty holders are appointed
  • sufficient time and resources are allocated.

Clients must also make sure that:

  • relevant information is prepared and provided to other duty holders
  • the principal designer and principal contractor carry out their duties
  • welfare facilities are provided.
  • F10 Notification to HSE

Contact us today to discuss your project requirements.

The Principal Designer

The principal designer’s role is to plan, manage and monitor the pre-construction phase, to co-ordinate health and safety. The pre-construction phase is defined as any period during which design or preparatory work is carried out for a project, which may continue during construction.

The principal designer must:

  • assist the client in identifying, obtaining and collating the pre-construction information
  • provide pre-construction information to designers, the principal contractor and contractors
  • ensure that designers comply with their duties and co-operate with each other
  • liaise with the principal contractor for the duration of the appointment
  • prepare the health and safety file
At project set up we…

Provide a schedule on appointment

Develop a good relationship with the client

Ensure you understand the brief

Clarify roles

Hold regular (conference) or attend design meetings

Undertake an early site visit

Raise issues/areas of concern early




Pre-construction phase

Review design programme to date – advise if missing

Arrange a pre-design meeting with the client and the designers

Where possible, seek contractor input during the design phase

Participate in design co-ordination meetings across all disciplines

Actively encourage designers to work together as a team

Encourage the designers to involve end users from the early stages of the design

Embed health and safety into everything

Encourage a consistent approach to how information is provided by the designers




Construction phase

Attend site or progress meetings (as requested)

Liaise with PC for ongoing design

Prepare and or review content for the health and safety file

Identify lessons learned

Designer/Architect/Engineers Area

Here at CDMPC, we understand that as a designer (whatever your specialism) CDM will never be top priority on your projects.

Many institutions and groups have their own sets of rules/codes of conduct.

This makes CDM confusing and sometimes quite counterproductive.

The following extracts are taken from the regulations, in all but the simplest of projects this can cause additional time and cost on your project.

That’s where we come in, we take the burden out of being Principal Designers, after all there is enough to do as designers.

We have set specially designed fee packages to cover all types of project

From one off advisory role to full ‘face to face’ appointed principal designer as part of your design team

For further reading, we have added designers guide below




Regulation 9 Duties of Designers
  1. A designer must not commence work in relation to a project unless satisfied that the client is aware of the duties owed by the client under these Regulations.
  2. When preparing or modifying a design the designer must take into account the general principles of prevention and any pre-construction information to eliminate, so far as is reasonably practicable, foreseeable risks to the health or safety of any person:‐
    1. carrying out or liable to be affected by construction work;
    2. maintaining or cleaning a structure; or
    3. using a structure designed as a workplace.
  3. If it is not possible to eliminate these risks, the designer must, so far as is reasonably practicable:‐
    1. take steps to reduce or, if that is not possible, control the risks through the subsequent design process;
    2. provide information about those risks to the principal designer; and
    3. ensure appropriate information is included in the health and safety file.
  4. A designer must take all reasonable steps to provide, with the design, sufficient information about the design, construction or maintenance of the structure, to adequately assist the client, other designers and contractors to comply with their duties under these Regulations.



Regulation 11 Duties of a principal designer in relation to health and safety at the pre-construction phase
  1. The principal designer must plan, manage and monitor the pre-construction phase and coordinate matters relating to health and safety during the pre-construction phase to ensure that, so far as is reasonably practicable, the project is carried out without risks to health or safety.
  2. In fulfilling the duties in paragraph (1), and in particular when:‐
    1. design, technical and organisational aspects are being decided in order to plan the various items or stages of work which are to take place simultaneously or in succession; and
    2. estimating the period of time required to complete such work or work stages, the principal designer must take into account the general principles of prevention and, where relevant, the content of any construction phase plan and health and safety file.
  3. In fulfilling the duties in paragraph (1), the principal designer must identify and eliminate or control, so far as is reasonably practicable, foreseeable risks to the health or safety of any person:‐
    1. carrying out or liable to be affected by construction work;
    2. maintaining or cleaning a structure; or
    3. using a structure designed as a workplace.
  4. In fulfilling the duties in paragraph (1), the principal designer must ensure all designers comply with their duties in regulation 9.
  5. In fulfilling the duty to coordinate health and safety matters in paragraph (1), the principal designer must ensure that all persons working in relation to the pre-construction phase cooperate with the client, the principal designer and each other.
  6. The principal designer must ‐
    1. assist the client in the provision of the pre-construction information required by regulation 4(4); and
    2. so far as it is within the principal designer’s control, provide pre-construction information, promptly and in a convenient form, to every designer and contractor appointed, or being considered for appointment, to the project.
  7. The principal designer must liaise with the principal contractor for the duration of the principal designer’s appointment and share with the principal contractor information relevant to the planning, management and monitoring of the construction phase and the coordination of health and safety matters during the construction phase.



Who is a principal designer?

A principal designer is the designer as defined in regulation 2(1) with control over the pre-construction phase of the project. This is the very earliest stage of a project from concept design through to planning the delivery of the construction work. The principal designer must be appointed in writing by the client. The principal designer can be an organisation or an individual that has:

  1. the technical knowledge of the construction industry relevant to the project;
  2. the skills, knowledge and experience to understand, manage and coordinate the pre-construction phase, including any design work carried out after construction begins.

Where the principal designer is an organisation, it must have the organisational capability to carry out the role. Principal designers may have separate duties as designers (see paragraphs 79–93).

Why is the principal designer important?

In liaison with the client and principal contractor, the principal designer has an important role in influencing how the risks to health and safety should be managed and incorporated into the wider management of a project. Decisions about the design taken during the pre-construction phase can have a significant effect on whether the project is delivered in a way that secures health and safety. The principal designer’s role involves coordinating the work of others in the project team to ensure that significant and foreseeable risks are managed throughout the design process.

CDMPC

CDM H&S Documentation, Systems and Procedures

As part of your obligations as a Company Director, and in the interest of carrying out works in accordance with The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 you are required to:
  1. Provide and maintain plant and systems of work which are, so far as is reasonably practicable, safe and without risks to health.
  2. Make arrangements for ensuring, so far as is reasonably practicable, safety and absence of risks to health in connection with the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances.
  3. Provide information, instruction, training and supervision as is necessary to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health and safety at work of your employees.
  4. Maintain in a condition that is safe and without risks to health, so far as is reasonably practicable, any place of work under your control.
  5. Provide means of access to and egress from any place of work under your control which is, so far as is reasonably practicable, safe and without risks to health.
  6. Provide and maintain for your employees a working environment that is, so far as is reasonably practicable, safe, without risks to health, and adequate as regards facilities and arrangements for their welfare at work.

In doing so, your company must have a H&S Policy when you employ 5 or more persons.

Having a H&S policy does not automatically cover all eventuality and certainly does not cover all checks and monitoring arrangements required to ensure policy is kept up to date.

In addition, certain H&S regulations within your industry, may require you to carry out additional checks or provide certain contractual documents.




How can we help

Primarily, we provide free advice and guidance, just give us a call.

After our initial discussion, we can provide advice, guidance, and fees to carry out the following:

  • Carry out a review of existing company documentation, systems, and procedures (applicable to your industry)
  • Advise on gaps or none compliance
  • Provide bespoke set of documents, systems and procedures
    • Typical documents required
      • H&S Policy (construction) or other industry
      • Sub-contractor controls
      • Construction Phase (Health & Safety Plan – CDM 2015 requirement)
      • Site documents, site/plant/PPE registers
      • Inspections checklist
      • RAMS templates
      • Project/manager work instructions

Depending on your needs, additional training can be give (or part of your package)

info@cdmpc.co.uk

07912496970